We Take Care of Our Horses

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Bagavond was a very fast turf sprinter who won a race for us each year from 2006 through 2009, all four of the wins at Belmont. When the aches and pains of racing caught up with him in 2010, we retired him to the tender care of our partner, Peggy Rees Smith, who retrained him for a new career as a riding horse and hunter-jumper.

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Bishop of Nola in the Saratoga Paddock, John Velasquez Up

Bishop of Nola in the Saratoga Paddock, John Velasquez Up

Bishop of Nola was a favorite of our partners, though we owned him for barely a year. Claimed at Saratoga in 2010, the NY-bred won two of his nine races for us, with six in-the-money finishes before being claimed away a year later. As happens with many horses, he gradually worked down the claiming ladder, ending up at Camarero in Puerto Rico. With the help of Kellie Stobie and her Caribbean Aftercare organization, we succeeded in 2016 in rescuing Bishop of Nola and placing him a well-deserved retirement in Florida.

 

Brave Sir Robin ran more races for Castle Village Farm than any other of our horses except Introspect -- 39 in total, in three years on the racetrack. He won three of those, finished in the money 15 times, and earned over $150,000. We even gave him a retirement party! But he couldn't stay away from the track, and eventually returned as a stable pony for trainer Bobbi Rossi. Can't keep a good horse down!

Brave Sir Robin Gets Up at the Wire

Brave Sir Robin Gets Up at the Wire

 
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If Brave Sir Robin was our most durable horse, Diligent Gambler was our winningest. In the two years we owned him, Diligent Gambler raced in our colors 28 times, with eight(!) wins, seven seconds and eight thirds, an 82% in-the-money rate, earning over $236,000. He was honored as the Florida-bred claiming horse of the year in 2004. After he was claimed away from us, we eventually bought him back to assure a safe retirement job as trainer Leah Gyarmati's stable pony. Unfortunately, he died much too soon, from a heart attack while on a brief vacation in 2013 from his job at the track.

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Fighting Speedy was a NY-filly that we were lucky enough to claim in Florida, because her then-owner wanted to watch her race in the winter. We took her back to New York and, in almost two years in our silks, she had a record of 22-4-7-5, with two black-type stakes placings and earnings of over $207,000. After she was claimed away and her racing days were done, we bought her back and arranged for her second career, as a broodmare in Kentucky.

 

Flippy Diane was our "foundation mare," the first horse that Castle Village Farm claimed, and our first stakes winner. We claimed her in July, 1999, as she was coming off a layoff, and three months later, trainer Leah Gyarmati and jockey Diane Nelson won the Maryland Million Distaff with her at Laurel Race Course. Her racing career ended the next year, and she went on to be a broodmare, with two of her foals, Unconcerned and Flip de Lite, winning in our colors. 

Flippy Diane with her baby Unconcerned

Flippy Diane with her baby Unconcerned

Introspect Wins at Belmont

Introspect Wins at Belmont

Introspect was both the most durable and the best horse we ever had. Purchased as a yearling for only $15,000, he ran 51 times for us, winning six, including the Hollie Hughes handicap at Aqueduct, and earning over $300,000. After he was claimed away, we managed to buy him back and arranged for his comfortable retirement in Virginia.

 

If Introspect was our most successful horse on the race track, then Pinecall has been our most successful off the track, in her second career as a show jumper. Under the tutelage of CVF partner Kathie Long in Canada, Pinecall, renamed Babe, has amassed scores of ribbons on the Ontario equestrian circuit, making us, her former owners, very proud.

Babe (nee Pinecall) schooling over fences

Babe (nee Pinecall) schooling over fences